Editors Ink

A place to examine language and the state of journalism. And anything else that comes to mind.

Monday, March 21, 2005

I wonder how effective the response of the mainstream media will be to some of these "citizen journalism" sites that are popping up. They have all kinds of potential, both good and bad, though I'm inclined to see a lot of good. I suspect, too, that some of these will go the way of such sites as about.com and be swallowed up, once their business and subscription viability has been established. While the msm be smart enough to see why people might turn to this kind of journalism or just react and try to kill it?

Here are two, taking somewhat different approaches:
Backfence



and

Pegasus News


And then a third offers further detail, promising to go live in about a week,
Now Public, according to Cyberjournalist.net


A new multimedia "citizen journalism" site called NowPublic is getting ready to launch. The site will allow readers to "assign" stories to reporters; sign up to be a reporter; file photographs, video and MP3s; and "build your own newsroom" and follow the news with "watchlists."

According to the beta version of the site, which is now password-protected, here's how the site will work:

First, a member logs in and opens an assignment for a reporter. Once the assignment is opened, it appears on the homepage of all reporters (provided they are logged in) in the area.
Once a reporter has filed a photograph, video or MP3, then the assignment becomes a news story and appears in the developing news section and within the appropriate categories.


And, this is from one of the guys behind Now Public:
This is Michael Tippett (one of the guys behind NowPublic). Here's our offical blurb:

"The news is now public thanks to new technology like camera phones, digital cameras, blogging tools, and RSS standards. NowPublic combines the functionality of these emerging tools to let people investigate, produce, and publish news that they care about.

With NowPublic, bloggers and citizen journalists can automatically dispatch reporters and photographers to the site of a news story anywhere in the world. At the same time photographers can safely distribute, manage, license and sell their work through NowPublic's portable, point-of-sale smart media format.

News readers can compare real-time, breaking stories to other coverage on the web and in the media, and because all NowPublic content is accessible and sortable into multiple and specific RSS feeds, reports are circulated back into the blogosphere."

If anyone wants more information about the site please don't hesitate to ping me.

Posted by Micheal Tippett March 21, 2005 11:43 AM

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